Primary healthcare in six sub-Saharan African countries: an impact assessment using a systematic review

  • Primary healthcare is provided in most developing and developed countries to enhance healthcare accessibility for the population. This study accesses the impact of primary healthcare in six Sub-Saharan countries. A systematic search for qualitative and quantitative studies published before the end of 2017 was conducted online. Inclusion criteria were met by 6 studies, one each from Ghana, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Five studies are peer-reviewed, and one is a working paper. Three studies reported on the impact of primary healthcare on healthcare accessibility. Four studies reported on the role healthcare resources play in enhancing primary healthcare services. Two other studies mentioned how cost-sharing mechanism led to an increase in healthcare utilization and how the reduction in user changes in all primary healthcare centers led to the reduction in out-of-pocket spending on healthcare services in a short-term. Primary healthcare offers access and utilization to healthcare services in most countries. It also offers protection against the detrimental effects of user fees. However, concerted efforts are still needed in most African countries in revitalizing the operations of primary healthcare centers for the improvement of healthcare services.

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Metadaten
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Parent Title (English):Internet Journal of Medical Update
Volume:14
Issue:1
First Page:22
Last Page:29
ISSN:1694-0423
URL:https://www.akspublication.com/vol14_no1_jan2019/paper4.html
DOI:https://doi.org/10.4314/ijmu.v14i1.5
Publisher:AKS Publications
Date of first publication:2019/08/03
Tag:Africa; Healthcare; PHC
Departments, institutes and facilities:Fachbereich Sozialpolitik und Soziale Sicherung
Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC):3 Sozialwissenschaften / 36 Soziale Probleme, Sozialdienste / 360 Soziale Probleme und Sozialdienste; Verbände
Entry in this database:2019/08/20